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Increase the Impact of Your Words with Alliteration

By August 19, 2020August 23rd, 2020No Comments
white text on dark background with laura boggs (representation) working on her laptop, writing an article using alliteration

I recently read a light and fun article on our preoccupation with “liking.” In “Like, Enough With The Liking Already,” (Funny Times) author Laura Boggs paints a vivid picture of our current fascination with thumbs up, likes, texting, and more about the ultra importance of liking.

What I wanted to share with you, was Laura Boggs rich language, chock full of figures of speech and good-natured humor. In particular, I wanted to share her use of repetition, in the form of alliteration.

To illustrate the difference of impact with and without the alliteration, you’ll see below what seems to be the same paragraphs. Rather, in the first instance, I changed all of the alliteration examples to synonyms. In the second instance, you’ll be able to enjoy Laura Boggs words as written.

When I read her article, I immediately appreciated her use of alliteration. How the sounds and cadence enhanced the words.

See and hear the difference. Then, I challenge you to think about using figures of speech in your written, spoken, and online communication. By using figures of speech such as metaphors/similes, sounds (onomatopoeia), and alliteration, you will increase the reader’s/listener’s enjoyment and your impact on them.

Below the paragraphs, you’ll find links to a variety of helpful, how-to articles I wrote on various figures of speech.

Without Alliteration

Like, Enough With The Liking Already
By Laura Boggs

To each her own, they say, but no one really means it.

Instead, must of us are convinced that what we like is, irrefutably, the best. And, make no mistake, we are a nation of professional-level likers, a people defined by our choices, politics and hobbies. We announce our preferences with bumper stickers and hashtags, t-shirts and cocktail party conversation. “I’m a dog person,” some say. Others assert they’re “a people person” — I am particularly suspicious of these.

Contrary to popular belief, your life is not the sum of your choices; rather, it’s a thoughtful collection of thumbs-ups. What you approve is what makes you you. I’m not speaking of the things you have to like, such as rescue pets or shopping locally but thinking globally. I am talking Apple or Microsoft, low-carb or vegetarian, with which Downton Abbey character you most identified (Lady Mary, thank you very much).

Original, With Alliteration

Like, Enough With The Liking Already
By Laura Boggs

To each her own, they say, but no one really means it.

Instead, must of us are convinced that what we like is, irrefutably, the best. And, make no mistake, we are a nation of professional-level likers, a people defined by our preferences, politics and pastimes. We announce our partialities with bumper stickers and hashtags, t-shirts and cocktail party conversation. “I’m a dog person,” some say. Others assert they’re “a people person” — I am particularly suspicious of these.

Contrary to popular belief, your life is not the sum of your choices; rather, it’s a carefully curated collection of thumbs-ups. What you approve is what makes you you. I’m not speaking of the things you have to like, such as rescue pets or shopping locally but thinking globally. I am talking Apple or Android, low-carb or vegetarian, with which Downton Abbey character you most identified (Lady Mary, thank you very much).

Figures of speech are an advanced technique I teach in my business class on public speaking, storytelling, and communication at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at Maryland and in my communication workshops, webinars, and keynote presentations.

Examples include Anadiplosis, Anaphora, Asyndeton, Epanalepis, Epiphora, Epizeuxis, and Onomatopoeia.

Read all of the articles on Figures of Speech here.

Photography Source:  FreePik, modified © Copyright 2020, The Chief Storyteller®, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
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Ira Koretsky

About Ira Koretsky

Ira Koretsky has built The Chief Storyteller® into one of the most recognized names in communication, especially business storytelling. He has delivered over 500 keynote presentations and workshops in nearly a dozen countries, in more than one hundred cities, across 30 plus industries. His specialties are simplifying the complex and communicating when the stakes are high. He is also an adjunct professor in public speaking and storytelling at the University of Maryland's Business School. With over 25 years of experience, he is a sought-after global speaker, trainer, consultant, and communication coach.