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Ira Koretsky
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Join NBPCI and The Chief Storyteller for a roll-up-your-sleeves workshop to make your three most important documents unforgettable to prospective government clients. They are your elevator speech, capability statement, and capability presentation. Turn your Big 3 into memorable, powerful packages inspiring prospects to say, “We need you.” 

The event is Tue, July 26, 8:30 - 11:30, Fairview Park Marriott Hotel, 3111 Fairview Park Drive, Falls Church, VA 22042.

*** We have secured a special rate just for friends of the The Chief Storyteller. Register today.

Detailed information is below...

The Big 3:  How to Grow Your Revenue with a Compelling Elevator Speech, Capabilities Statement, and Capabilities Presentation

Learn how to develop high impact messages with supporting talking points, content, and win themes through easy-to-follow processes. Your program is rich with practical ideas and thought-provoking exercises you can implement immediately.

Bring hardcopies of your Big 3 documents and your laptop, as you’ll be making changes to your documents during the program.

* Special Offer:  For 30 days following the workshop, you are eligible for a free review of one of your Big 3 documents. Each review includes personalized suggestions.

Benefits of Attending
- Learn a powerful, internationally-taught process for developing compelling and engaging sales messages
- Make changes in real-time to each of your core sales tools
- Be inspired with proven, fresh ideas to convert prospects into clients

Your Program Includes:
- 30-page workbook filled with exercises, examples, how-to’s, processes, and templates
- Three, multi-page tip guides
- Free access to over 700 thought-provoking articles, ideas, and tips
- Copy of the presentation in PDF
- A 3-hour hands-on workshop, along with a specific action plan for improving your Big 3

We have secured a special rate just for friends of the The Chief Storyteller. Register today.

About Your Presenter, Ira Koretsky, The Chief Storyteller ®
Ira has been helping companies like yours develop strategic messaging and content management frameworks for over 23 years. He knows how to help you turn your Big 3 into documents getting prospects to say, “We need you.” Ira has delighted audiences around the world turning business stories into revenue. He is a sought-after speaker, consultant, columnist, and trainer. Be inspired with his mantra, “Think deliberately and differently.” Stay engaged with insightful exercises and actionable ideas you can implement immediately.
The Chief Storyteller helped IntelliDyne win a $94 million contract with the Federal government, TCIG quadruple its contracting revenue in six months, professionals at the EPA develop clear and compelling mission statements, and the CDC develop a complete outreach program for an important community health initiative.

Complete biography chiefstoryteller_pdf

Over the past month I received quite a few questions around Tweeting effectively. I thought I'd share the Tip of the Week in our blog...

Did you know the maximum length of a tweet is 140 characters? Most Tweeters know this. What most people do not know is there are three reasons to keep your tweet length to 100 characters or less.

Adding (1) Hashtags, (2) Mentions of Twitter user names, and (3) Website links reduces the actual length of a tweet by ~30%.

1) Hashtags:  Are on average, eight to 10 characters. See example below.

At board retreat w/ Engineers Canada. At dinner, president intro'd > 50 people by name & province. Impressive! #leadership #engineering
- Characters:  135
- Hashtags:  #leadership #engineering

2) Twitter usernames:  Are a max of 15 characters. If you include someone's username, it appears in the tweet as something like @chiefstorytellr. See example below. According to Twitter,

"Your username can contain up to 15 characters. Why no more? Because we append your username to your 140 characters on outgoing SMS updates and IM messages. If your name is longer than 15 characters, your message would be too long to send in a single text message."

article-new one written 4 job hunters @MENGonline "Write a Resume Summary that Gets Interviews" http://bit.ly/9b0mv9
- Characters:  102
- Username:  @MENGonline (11 characters)
- Website link:  http://bit.ly/9b0mv9 (20 characters)

3) Website links:  Links are on average 20 characters if you use a site that shortens like bit.ly. See example below.

blog-50 Business Storytelling Mantras to Live By-what would you add? http://bit.ly/hHqKyo #storytelling
- Characters:  135
- Hashtags:  #storytelling
- Website link: http://bit.ly/hHqKyo (20 characters)

It's time to embrace the copywriter in you. Think of your tweets as long headlines or long email subject lines. Having only 100 characters makes communicating to your target audiences even more challenging in simultaneously developing the message and providing value.

This morning I attended a breakfast discussion on mobile technologies hosted by AFCEA Bethesda, "Mobile Technologies – Info on the Go."  While the focus was on technology, one of my conversation partners asked my opinion on what has changed with regard to messaging and mobile.

Without hesitation, I told her, "it hasn't."

Advertising and messaging has ALWAYS been about using the right words to attract the right audiences. Mobile is just another means of connecting to and with audiences.

Think about the common attributes of successful advertising campaign. Some of the top attributes include:

- Unified message. This message brings everything together in a short and succinct phrase. Think newspaper or magazine headline.  And the message is unified through all communications used by the organization.

- Unforgettable message. The message is memorable and understandable. Effective word-of-mouth relies on these very principles. One of the best examples are the commercials during the US Super Bowl. Can you name another televised event where consumers truly look forward to the commercials?

- Story. Advertising needs a story the listener/reader can immediately relate to. Great advertising is all about the shared experience. The advertising has to deliver on making tomorrow better, in some way. Otherwise, why would anyone buy it?

- Specific target audience. Specific campaigns to specific audiences yield better results time and time again over broad appeal campaigns.

- Integrated approach. Organizations use the right communication channels to reach the right audiences. Today, we have the traditional channels of magazines, newspapers, billboards, television, and radio. The newer channels include mobile, blogs, video blogs, podcasts, banners, and videos (Note:  We've identified over 450 communication elements today...so there are lots more I could add).

- Measurement system.  Marketing must evaluate continuously what is working and what is not working. Think A|B testing or more complex approaches with A|B|C|D|X testing, surveys, couponing, and polls.

Additional Resources:

- AdAge.com, Top 100 Advertising Campaigns
- Define Yourself in a Way That’s Relevant to Your Target Audience
- Advertising is the Same Worldwide

Over the weekend, I took the family to one of our favorite restaurants. As we were leaving, I noticed the van and how busy it was in regard to the various messaging elements (over 20).

The "Cool prices ... Warm Service!" phrase stood out--it was memorable, short, and playful.  It prompted me to find them on the Internet.

The home page is simple, and I was glad to see the slogan unified with the website messaging (MBS Mechanical website). 

Have you ever used playful messages in your communications? 

Imagine you’re organizing an event and you’re asking people to participate. You’re trying to persuade them to join you. The story you tell them should include one or more personal benefits each of them may realize by participating.

In his latest post on business storytelling, Ira shared three tips for inspiring others to action through our stories. Including personal benefits in your story falls under his third tip, “Make the journey relevant.”

You can do this by including elements in your story that answer questions like “So what?” and “What’s in it for me?” Your target audience is more likely to act if you can show them how each member might gain something of perceived value from participating. In other words, make the journey relevant to them.

Take, for example, the upcoming Bike to Work Day event on May 20th. If I positioned it as a healthy and clean way to get to work, it’s not likely I would garner a lot of attention from commuters who fear the hassles of dealing with rush hour traffic at busy intersections and working up a sweat on their way to work.

On the other hand, by appealing to their dislike of sitting in rush hour traffic, I might be able to persuade more of them to join me. I wrote a similar post last year, where I included the view of the road from my bike and asked readers to compare it to the view from their windshield that day. The “so what?” was implied by the image – take your bike to work and avoid sitting in rush hour traffic.

If you’re looking for a way to avoid sitting in rush hour traffic on May 20th, have I made the bike to work journey relevant to you?

Article Summary:  Everyone is a storyteller. You are a storyteller. You tell personal and professional stories every day. Whether you direct an international association, manage a government program, run a small business, or serve as the CEO of a Fortune 500 company, consider every written, verbal, and social media communication as a business story. You need to inspire others around you to achieve your goals. The greatest bonding and trust-building tools we have are effective stories. Use these three tips to help you leverage your skills as a storyteller to generate results from your various career activities. [Note, this article was originally written for the Marketing Executives Networking Group (MENG)

If you have any preferences or requests for topics, contact us by telephone, email, or leave a comment on this blog entry.

To read other articles in The Chief Storyteller Blog, select the category, Articles.

 

The Personal Storyteller - 3 Tips to Improve Your Communications Skills
© 2011. The Chief Storyteller®, LLC.
Ira J. Koretsky
March 2011

Everyone is a storyteller. You are a storyteller. You tell personal and professional stories every day. You tell them to friends, colleagues, family members, and even to strangers you meet while waiting in line at the grocery store. 

Whether you direct an international association, manage a government program, run a small business, or serve as the CEO of a Fortune 500 company, consider every written, verbal, and social media communication as a business story. 

Storytelling is the oldest, most effective form of communication. That’s why stories are in everything we do and say as professionals. Examples include your elevator speech (your answer to "What Do You Do?"), presentations, proposals, emails, website, success stories, testimonials, and social media content.  A subcategory is career stories. Examples include your cover letter, resume, testimonials, recommendations, answer to “Tell me about yourself,” and accomplishments.

By reaching your audience's heart and mind, you access the part of them that wants to believe in what you have to offer. You need to inspire others around you to achieve your goals. The greatest bonding and trust-building tools we have are effective stories. 

As you tell your various career stories, consider the three major reasons people share them in a business context: 

- Inspire action, change, or new ways of thinking 
- Bridge gaps (e.g., culture, generation, gender, and understanding)
- Build a shared vision of a better future

Use these tips to help you leverage your skills as a storyteller to generate results from your various career activities. 

1. Have a Clear Beginning, Middle, and End
Follow a story structure. While there is no absolutely right way to tell a story, personal stories are frequently shared more for entertainment and enjoyment than for a specific business objective. For this reason, look at business stories a little differently. 

One of the most important differences is the need to use structure. People want to know your story is going “somewhere” and it will make a point. Use the classic storytelling convention of beginning, middle, and end.  It’s familiar and time-tested.

2. Tell Your Story with a Specific Message in Mind
Ensure your story has one clear message. Imagine you just finished telling your story. What do you want your reader or listener to learn, do differently, or think about? Do not assume your audience will know what to do with your story or message. You have to tell them in a manner that resonates quickly.

A helpful way to develop a targeted message is to put it in a category. Examples include process, communication, customer service, safety, leadership, strategy, teamwork, innovation, and quality assurance. After selecting the category, apply one of the major reasons shared above (i.e., inspire action, bridge gaps, and better future). Then use relevant words and phrases from the category and important to your target audiences. 

The most important message is the one contained in your answer, “Tell me about yourself” or what I like to call the elevator speech of job hunting. This is definitely a “better future” story. It sets the framework for everything else you communicate. Ensure your answer is short, on-target, and helps your audience understand that by hiring you, you are going to help them build a better future (e.g., grow the organization’s revenue, increase market awareness, and improve brand recognition).

3. Make the “Journey” Relevant
Make your story pass the “so what” test. Invite your audience into your experience by sharing the WIIFM—What’s In It For Me. Well-told stories create a shared experience. This enables them to understand your message on a personal level. Your words should crystallize common values and experiences. You have to touch someone’s heart before they’ll act.  

Think Differently and Deliberately
With the highly competitive job market, knowing in advance what is important to your audience will be a major contributor to your success. Select the right stories, deliberately, for your audiences. Practice saying and writing your various business/career stories. Find a balance between business and emotion that works for you personally and that resonates with your audiences. 

Look around and listen to the world around you. Observe the storytelling in everything. What can you do to emulate the success in the various business stories you observe in your own stories? Are you ready to share the right stories to the right audiences? And will your stories generate the right results?

Eugene Finerman in The Toastmasters, shared an excellent way of looking at stories. He said, “Every word has a story…one word can tell an epoch of history, define the attitude of an era, or reflect an ancestral sense of humor.”

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Ira Koretsky is the president of The Chief Storyteller®, a boutique marketing and sales consulting firm. He has delighted audiences around the world helping them achieve better business outcomes and accelerate their revenue with highly effective written, spoken, and social media communications. With over 25 years of experience, he is a sought-after global speaker, columnist, consultant, and executive coach. Find him on Twitter, LinkedIn®, and YouTube.

 

I met Colin, the CEO of E Group at a regional government contractors conference. After a great conversation, we exchanged business cards. As per my norm, I looked at the card front and then back.

Lo and behold, I was compelled to read the back. I discovered Colin's personal statement (see images below).

I excitedly peppered him with all sorts of messaging-related questions. As the CEO, Colin shared everyone in the company has his/her own customized card (as a second example, see Frank's card below).  

In all of my 25 plus years of professional networking and personal events attended...in meeting thousands and thousands of people, I can without hesitation say this is truly a unique card. The other unique card comes from Superhero cards (read Mere Mortal or Superhero? and I Love Being a Superhero).

What are you doing to stand out and be unforgettable?

Article Summary As in the in the corporate world, a unified message is critical to your career success. Imagine you meet Jana, a prospective hiring executive at an event. Based on your brief encounter, you know she likes you since she mentioned the possibility of an available position. What do you think she’ll do first thing tomorrow morning? You can bet it will be an online search. What will she find? Unifying your career communications will set you apart from your competition. It will ensure your target audiences read and hear a consistent selling proposition, supporting messages, key words, success stories, and accomplishments. [Note, this article was originally written for the Marketing Executives Networking Group (MENG)

If you have any preferences or requests for topics, contact us by telephone, email, or leave a comment on this blog entry.

To read other articles in The Chief Storyteller Blog, select the category, Articles.

 

Communications Audit:  10 Critical Communication Elements for Your Career Success
© 2011. The Chief Storyteller®, LLC.
Ira J. Koretsky
February 2011

As in the in the corporate world, a unified message is critical to your career success. Imagine you meet Jana, a prospective hiring executive at an event. Based on your brief encounter, you know she likes you since she mentioned the possibility of an available position. What do you think she’ll do first thing tomorrow morning? You can bet it will be an online search.

What will she find? Will she find a dynamic and compelling profile on LinkedIn? On Facebook? On Twitter? How about articles, blog posts, and tweets you authored? Press releases with quotes of yours? Slide presentations from conferences you spoke at? And the list goes on…

After she reads these varied resources, what will Jana think about you? Will she see an executive with a unified message? Or someone with a disparate career story?

Unifying your career communications will set you apart from your competition. It will ensure your target audiences read and hear a consistent selling proposition, supporting messages, key words, success stories, and accomplishments.

Among the many questions you should be asking yourself are the five listed below. Thinking through these will start you on the path of unifying your career communications story elements. The answers to them all must be a resounding “yes!”

1.    Are your social media sites unified for key messages, your unique selling proposition, and personal brand attributes?
2.    Are your recommenders ready to communicate the right messages to recruiters and prospective hiring companies?
3.    Do your written materials accurately portray your skills and accomplishments?
4.    Will your LinkedIn profile quickly impress readers?
5.    Do the success stories (e.g., bullet statements) on your resume also appear in similar formats and key messages in your tweets, blogs, and LinkedIn profile?

Based on your situation and expectations of your target audiences, identify the career communications elements with the highest potential impact. Then map out a plan for completing the top one to three elements next week. Develop the schedule over the coming month to complete and revise the remaining ones.

Look for consistency across all of your career communications elements. Look for consistency in key words and phrases, the tone of voice in your messages, and the attributes of your unique selling proposition.  

1.    LinkedIn (especially your professional headline, picture, and summary)
2.    FaceBook (especially your picture and information tab)
3.    Twitter (especially your background image and profile)
4.    Blog (especially your most recent five to seven postings and profile)
5.    Cover letter
6.    Resume
7.    Recommendations (these are the specific and deliberate written recommendations in letters and in LinkedIn)
8.    Success stories/accomplishments
9.    Ideal Company Profile
10.    Elevator speech/your answer to “Tell me about yourself” (this is your unique selling proposition)

"What really decides consumers to buy or not to buy is the content of your advertising, not its form."
— David Ogilvy

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Ira Koretsky is the president of The Chief Storyteller®, a boutique marketing and sales consulting firm. He has delighted audiences around the world helping them achieve better business outcomes and accelerate their revenue with highly effective written, spoken, and social media communications. With over 25 years of experience, he is a sought-after global speaker, columnist, consultant, and executive coach. Find him on Twitter, LinkedIn®, and YouTube.

 

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Simple Sells When Going Green

In my previous post, I mentioned Baja Fresh had found a simple and compelling way to promote an offer for a reusable plastic drink cup. Before I tell you what it is, let me give you two versions of the same message.  I’m going to ask you to pick the one you think Baja Fresh chose.

To help you decide, I want you to evaluate how well each of the messages I've provided answers these 3 questions:
1. Does the offer make sense to the consumer?
2. Does the offer communicate a clear benefit to the consumer?
3. Do the key sales points stand out?

Let’s start with the first hypothetical message, which could have been written by a pricing manager:

Get refills at 3.3¢ per fluid ounce, plus applicable sales tax, every time you present this 30-ounce cup at participating Baja Fresh locations.

Now consider the second message, which could have been written by a member of the marketing department:

REFILLS 99¢ FOREVER

Both messages essentially say the same thing. One is easier to understand, implies a clearer consumer benefit, and stands out more. Which do you think Baja Fresh chose? 

You guessed it, they chose the second one: “REFILLS 99¢ FOREVER”.  Take a closer look at the image I included in Tuesday’s post, and you’ll see it toward the bottom of the cup. If you look closely, you might even see a call-to-action immediately under the offer description: “Save a cup every time you refill this one.”

A message so simple, it has compelled my 8th and 10th graders to make repeated visits to the local Baja Fresh… cups in hand, $1.04 (the cost of the refill including sales tax) in their pockets, and smiles on their faces.  I can only imagine the number of cups they are saving.

You can still catch the first part of this story here:
- A FRESH Approach to Going Green

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

A FRESH Approach to Going Green

I’m always fascinated when my 8th and 10th graders find an offer they are passionate about. Take the recent Baja Fresh in-store promotion, which asks consumers to save the Earth one cup at a time by refilling a reusable drink cup each time they visit.

Why would two teen-aged boys who aren’t overly passionate about the environment want to do this, I wondered, when clearly it would be easier for them to get their drinks in a disposable paper cup?

The creative on one side of the cup features a prominent headline, “Doing Our Part for Global Cooling,” between two images of birds and leafy green trees. In an interesting play on words, Baja Fresh has taken a negative consequence of pollution (e.g., global warming) and magically transformed it into a positive outcome (e.g., global cooling) their customers could experience firsthand…literally.

So Baja Fresh is a company that cares about our environment, or at least that’s my perception of the brand. Their main message seems to be they are doing their part to help the environment and with a little effort, I can do my part, too. I can do my part every time I refill the reusable cup. Sounds simple enough, right?

I asked my boys if this is what made them buy the cup.  No, came the answer. It was something much more basic and personal than that – it was the benefit Baja Fresh was offering to consumers like us who participate. And it made sense to them... every time I do my part, I get a large drink for half price.

By offering consumers a FRESH way to save money and the Earth, Baja Fresh succeeded in motivating two teenagers to do their part. Again… and again.

Read my next post, Simple Sells When Going Green, for more on the compelling offer description that inspired my teenagers to do their part.

I have always loved video games. Anyone that plays or follows the industry knows how realistic they are becoming. Sounds, dialogue, scenery, locations and geography, and much more.

It's no surprise Jeep Wrangler has partnered with one of the top grossing video games, Call of Duty: Black Ops. Jeep has produced a special version call the Black Ops Edition.  

Visit the website and you'll be greeted to this home page along with battle sound effects. I really like the tagline of "The Only Vehicle Tough Enough to Play in this World."

A few suggestions to add media and consumer attention:  
>- Run a contest for game owners to win a Jeep
- Offer an in-game cheat you only can get from an authorized Jeep dealer
- Use social media like Twitter for a short-time to create additional buzz

* click on the image to view larger size

* Click on the image below to visit the Jeep site. While on the Jeep web site, click on the small image on the bottom of the screen to view the 30 second commercial

One of our mantras here at The Chief Storyteller® is to know your audience. When you are defining yourself to your target audience, be sure to do it in a way that’s relevant to them. It’s one of the best ways to drive the results you are looking for.

Let’s assume you are introducing your brand, yourself, or even your website to a highly mobile audience. In a simple and compelling way, you want to quickly tell the story about you and how you can be of value to them (i.e., What do you do?). The question then becomes how best to accomplish this.

In an age where increasingly large numbers of mobile workers are carrying Smartphones and where you have less than 30 seconds to make a first and lasting impression, an image can be worth a thousand words.

One way to reach a target audience with these characteristics is to include a Quick Response (QR) or other two-dimensional code in your marketing and advertising, your business cards, or even your social networking sites. When a prospect scans or reads a QR code with an iPhone, Android, or other camera-enabled Smartphone, he or she is given immediate access to the multimedia digital content of your choice. Within seconds, you can direct your target audience members to a homepage, a mobile landing page, a social media site like Facebook, or other web portal.

In the example below, I’ve provided the QR code to our home page.

 

Take out your Smartphone and give it a try (your Smartphone will need to be enabled with a QR code reader app). You might just find the right image really is worth a thousand words.

Let’s assume you’ve done your homework. You know why you should invest in social media (e.g., engage with your customers). You have a good idea of what you’re hoping to gain (e.g., increased brand loyalty). And everyone on your senior management team agrees on how you will measure success (e.g., a larger network of influencers compiled from your most loyal followers).

So now what? How do you build your brand’s network of influence with social media?

Here are five tips for making the most out of your brand’s social media investment:
• Make your content relevant, interesting, and unique.
• Listen more than you speak – the best relationships are built on a healthy respect for other people’s opinions.
• Participate frequently and regularly to show you are dependable.
• Share other people’s great ideas and be sure to give credit where credit is due.
• Measure and evaluate your success...continuously.

For more information on making the most of your brand's social media investment, please see:
Extend Your Brand’s Reach with Twitter
Social Media Playground Rules – Are You a Giver or a Taker?
Business Storytelling for Social Media
Social Media – Are You Connected?
Content is King in Social Media

What kind of experience do you provide for your employees? Why does it matter?

Fortune magazine’s 2011 list of “The 100 Best Companies to Work For” hit the newsstands the other day. I was glad to see one of my personal favorites, Wegman’s Food Markets, on the list for the 14th consecutive year.

While I’ve never worked for Wegman’s, I have been a big fan ever since they opened a store near my home a few years ago. I frequently shop there and enjoy eating in the dining area that overlooks the Bakery and Market Cafe areas. From this vantage point, it’s easy to catch a glimpse of why their employee experience continues to be recognized by Fortune and why it matters.

On any given day, you’ll notice there are Wegman’s employees everywhere – behind the counters, on the selling floor mingling with customers, restocking merchandise, and at the cash registers. You’ll almost always see one or more managers, along with one of the store’s in-house chefs, on the selling floor. Everywhere you look, their employees are on the move and are eager to interact with their customers. Most noticeable – and this is what makes Wegman’s unique – is how virtually all of them greet one another and their customers with a smile.

This is clearly a place where people are special and like coming to work. Consequently, it’s a fun place to be – for their employees and their customers. By providing their employees with a positive experience, Wegman’s is making it easy for them to do the same for their customers. And that’s what compels customers like me and so many others to keep coming back.

For more on outstanding employee experiences and their impact on customers, please see:
Fortune’s 100 Best Companies: What Words Describe You?
Be Different – Thank Your Customers
How Great Customer Service Turned Ordinary Take-Out Into Something Remarkable

Like most of you, I receive a large number of email marketing messages. In about 3 seconds or less, I typically decide whether I will open or delete each email. What typically grabs my attention and compels me to act are the words in the subject line.

So when I received an email the other day from my wireless provider that said, “Exclusive customer invitation,” it grabbed my attention. I had to open it.

The email was an exclusive customer invitation to purchase an iPhone 4 before everyone else. Although it was a little copy heavy and included far too many links, I was captivated by its single message – exclusive customer invitation. It made me feel special. It was personal and it offered me an immediate benefit (e.g., the opportunity to get the iPhone 4 first). And, it actually compelled me to click-through some of the links in the email to learn more.

As an email marketer, there are some techniques you can use when writing your emails to help ensure they are opened and acted upon. One of those is to use a compelling subject line.  The subject line is one of the first things your readers will see after receiving your email. You want your subject line to scream, “Read Me!” You have fewer than 50 characters or less than ten words to write the most important part of your message. Make your headlines personal and offer a benefit. Grab the heart first, then the brain.

Last month I attended another great event from the local Meeting Planners International (MPI) Potomac Chapter.  Carolyn Kepcher was the luncheon keynote speaker. You may know Carolyn as one of the original judges on Donald Trump's The Apprentice. Now she is running an advice and self-help site geared toward women called Work Her Way.

When it was time for us to move from networking to lunch, we were greeted by a card leave-behind at our seats as you can see in the picture below.  The card front and back are very well done from branding, messaging, and call-to-action perspectives.

All too often we forget that every single communication item tells your business story. 



Article Summary When it comes to resumes, people either love them or hate them, depending on where they sit. Hiring teams love to sort them quickly into “yes,” “maybe,” and “no” categories. All too often, job hunters hate having to distill their entire educational background, career history, and accomplishments into just two short pages. This article helps you make the process of developing a great resume easier. It will help you customize your resume to demonstrate the strength of your skills and expertise through powerful, must-read accomplishments.  [Note, this article was originally written for the Marketing Executives Networking Group (MENG)

If you have any preferences or requests for topics, contact us by telephone, email, or leave a comment on this blog entry.

To read other articles in The Chief Storyteller Blog, select the category, Articles.

 

Every Accomplishment Should Be Great:  5 Steps to Compelling Resume Accomplishments
© 2011. The Chief Storyteller®, LLC.
Ira J. Koretsky
January 2011

When it comes to resumes, people either love them or hate them, depending on where they sit. Hiring teams love to sort them quickly into “yes,” “maybe,” and “no” categories. All too often, job hunters hate having to distill their entire educational background, career history, and accomplishments into just two short pages.

This article helps you make the process of developing a great resume easier. It will help you customize your resume to demonstrate the strength of your skills and expertise through powerful, must-read accomplishments.

1. List Your Accomplishments
List all, yes, ALL, of your accomplishments for every position in your career. I can hear you grumbling now (smile). It is critical for you to take inventory of all of your accomplishments, big and small.

I’ve seen it happen too often…a job seeker leaving something out of his accomplishments that could compel the hiring executive to say aloud, “Bring this person in for an interview!” Consider this a brainstorming step. Only write one to three short sentences for each.

2. Qualify and Quantify
Qualify and quantity your accomplishments with statistics. Just as with step one, consider this a brainstorming step. Spend only three to five minutes per accomplishment. In step five, you will add more details (see example below).

You may find it helpful to ask yourself a number of questions to capture best the benefits and impact of your accomplishments. The key question is “Why is this important?” Break this question down further and ask, “What were the benefits and results to my organization? What was improved, changed, reduced, streamlined, accelerated, saved, developed, and so forth?”  

“Before” Example:  Managed rollout of new branding strategy throughout our company.

Questions to Ask Yourself:
Did you achieve it on time? Within budget? What measured change occurred to customer perceptions, recognition, awareness, media coverage, sales, etc.? What measured change occurred internally in staff productivity, customer service, communications, processes, etc.?

3. Identify the Success Criteria for Your Prospective Job
Extract the success criteria for your prospective position. A two-column table makes this step easier. In column one, row by row, include every sentence hinting at or directly specifying success criteria from the position description or your own knowledge. You will fill out column two in step four.

For example, here is one sentence from a publicly available position description for a Chief Marketing Officer (CMO). In reality, it represents numerous success criteria. Separate out each success criterion in each sentence (see table below for a quick example). The more detailed and specific you make the success criteria, the easier it is to match your accomplishments.

Equipped with clear and concrete examples of expanding and improving a brand, product, and/or service within a business, this person will continually analyze and utilize measurable metrics to improve every customer experience across all platforms (web, e-mail, mobile, tablets, etc.).

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4. Match Your Accomplishments to Key Success Criteria
Put your relevant accomplishments in column two that are matched to the success criteria in column one. Match as many accomplishments as you can. After you have completed the matching process, prioritize your accomplishments within each success criterion. Prioritize your accomplishments based on the position description and your research on the prospective organization.

5. Write and Rewrite
Develop your accomplishments into powerful and compelling accomplishments. Every accomplishment in your resume must support your career headline and your summary (see earlier article, “How to Write a Resume Summary that Gets Interviews”).

Here’s how the “Before” accomplishment from step two was revised.

“After” Example:  Spearheaded rollout of master brand strategy to 11 national and international locations, to more than 3,200 staff. Achieved 94% brand consistency within three years—one year earlier than estimated.  

It’s an Evolving Story Element
Because every position, hiring executive, and organization is different, you must customize your accomplishments for each application. Customizing becomes an easier process when you have a master list.

Remember, your resume is just one element of your business story (e.g., elevator speech, LinkedIn profile, blog articles, tweets, referrals, cover letter, resume, interview, accomplishments, success stories, etc.). In your resume, your career theme and summary set the expectations of the hiring executive. Meeting those expectations means you must offer fully developed (qualified and quantified) and customized accomplishments.

Louis Pasteur (1822 - 1895), famous chemist, said “Le hasard ne favorise que les esprits prepares.” Translated, it says, “Chance favors only the prepared mind.”

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Ira Koretsky is the president of The Chief Storyteller®, a boutique marketing and sales consulting firm. He has delighted audiences around the world helping them achieve better business outcomes and accelerate their revenue with highly effective written, spoken, and social media communications. With over 25 years of experience, he is a sought-after global speaker, columnist, consultant, and executive coach. Find him on Twitter, LinkedIn®, and YouTube.

 

Advertising Age recently published the article, "For CMOs, 2011 Will Be About Explaining Why, Not How."  Jonathan Salem Baskin starts his article:

OK, the new year has barely begun and most of us are still basking in the glow of that big uptick in holiday sales. You probably also got your fill of 2011 predictions before New Year's, most of which were simply restatements of the old year's news only with the verb tenses changed and some biases and hopes thrown in as "trends."

So I'm going to channel Scrooge and Nostradamus and suggest to you three things:

- Ignore the holiday results.
- Tune out the noise.
- Ask a different question.

Baskin takes some interesting positions challeging CMOs to think differently. And toward the end of the article states,

Brands are different only if they're really different, and this year would be the perfect opportunity to come up with the substantive reasons why consumers need yours vs. how you're going to use neat new ways to tell them the same old things.

About a year ago I came across these very clever commercials from Ally Bank. Blog Entry 1 has the first commmercial and Blog Entry 2 has three more commercials.

Here are links to three more. Watch them at least twice. While the commercials are humorous, they are negative. They do have very strong messages.

What do you think? Would love to read your thoughts in the comments...

 

Ice cream (YouTube video link here)

Egg Management Fee (YouTube video link here)

No Run Around (YouTube video link here)




If you’re looking to become a market leader (and who isn’t?), why not consider Twitter as a tool for helping to extend your brand’s reach among customers, suppliers, and partners?

Since its inception in 2006, Twitter has evolved from a free microblogging and messaging service whose sole purpose was to answer the question, “What are you doing now?” (in 140 characters or less), to one of today’s most powerful social media branding tools. Twitter is now as much about sharing valuable content with communities of interest as it is about interacting with others and building relationships. By Twitter’s own estimate, its popularity had grown to 175 million registered users by September 2010.

As a branding tool, Twitter makes it easy for you to define your brand and extend its reach. Your profile includes your handle, avatar, brief bio, and website link – all of which you determine.  From there, you engage and attract followers from around the world by sharing unique and compelling content – your business stories, as an example – that reinforces your desired brand perception.

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As you attract new followers (also called peeps or tweeps), you’ll notice some of their followers will begin to follow you. In turn, you’ll learn new things about your peeps by interacting with them – like what they think is important or how you might be able to help with the challenges they face. In the process, you’ll even discover others you may decide to follow.

Help turn your business stories into results by extending your brand’s reach on Twitter. The messages and content you share will drive business relationships within your community of interest.

Learn more on how you can use Twitter to extend your brand from these articles:
- When You Tweet, Think About What You Want Your Followers to Do
- If You Tweet, Consider Using Categories
- Business Storytelling for Social Media

We have various guides and templates in the office. Guides for writing blogs, articles, and tip guides. We have a brand guide for color, font, format, and logo use. What we don't have is a consolidated list, in one place, of all our mantras--the phrases, statements, aha's, rules, etc.--that "guide" us as we create and deliver content, messages, and great business stories.

Here are our top 50. Think about this list and how it can help prompt new and fresh approaches to your business stories. We would love to hear your mantras...please leave them in the comments.

1.    It’s all about them.
2.    Business stories are the engine of relationships and relationships are the engine of continued success.
3.    Write to the 10th grade level.
4.    Be memorable.
5.    Use humor if you want to.
6.    Content is king.
7.    Relationships matter.
8.    Credibility is more important than expertise in the beginning of relationships.
9.    Know your elevator speech / elevator pitch / mission statement (core business story).
10.    Ensure your core business story is unified throughout all communication materials.
11.    Your brand story is everything.
12.    Success stories are key to differentiation.
13.    (Good) blog and article content matters the most.
14.    Strive for “interest” questions. Avoid “understanding” questions.
15.    Social communities are built on personal and business stories.
16.    Everything you write, speak, and record online is a business story.
17.    Content first. Design second.
18.    Always have a second person read your content before publishing.
19.    Design your website for your target audiences (not your employees).
20.    Everyone builds relationships through networking.
21.    Send hand-written thank you notes, especially job hunters.
22.    Audiences are hungry for original thought-provoking content.
23.    Blogs are for sharing, educating, and inspiring…not selling.
24.    Get yourself known (e.g., LinkedIn questions and answers, post to SlideShare, and Tweet good information).
25.    Generating genuine interest in your product/service is the first step in building a relationship.
26.    Active listening is key to building great relationships.
27.    Write in your authentic voice.
28.    But is the worst word in the English language (and many other languages).
29.    Words really, really matter.
30.    Treat everyone like a CEO.
31.    Stop listening to your Mother. Talk to strangers at networking events.
32.    It’s not who you know, it’s who knows you.
33.    Speak in headlines.
34.    Write and speak conversationally.
35.    Treat every client like your best client.
36.    Maintain a detailed Ideal Target Profile for your key target audiences.
37.    Have positive self-talk conversations.
38.    Change is a choice.
39.    Deliver on the expected experience.
40.    Create your own success momentum.
41.    Be a student everyday.
42.    Be a deliberate networker.
43.    Be a deliberate communicator.
44.    Be a people bridge and make referrals.
45.    Be a mentor.
46.    Be a whole body communicator.
47.    Write emails as if they will be read on a smart phone.
48.    Inspire Action: facts do not persuade and inspire, people do.
49.    First Impressions Make Lasting Impressions: offer a warm smile, firm handshake, and good eye contact.
50.    People are at the heart of every great story.

I’ve always thought of sunglasses as something rather ordinary – a mass-produced, inexpensive commodity I could pick up in any drug or department store. All of this changed this past summer when my teen-aged son asked me to try on his pair of “Oakleys”.

I knew in an instant Oakley, Inc. had succeeded in turning the ordinary into something remarkable. The fit and feel of his sunglasses were like nothing I had ever experienced before. Through a unique blend of art and science, their products have made Oakley one of the most widely recognized brands in performance and fashion, particularly among the hundreds of professional and amateur athletes who sport Oakley products while competing.

As Oakley’s online brand overview proclaims, “It’s in our DNA to identify problems, create inventions, and wrap those inventions in art.” During a visit to one of their retail stores, I saw how easily the sales associate was able to build a pair of sunglasses around my own particular needs, likes, and dislikes.

Within a few short minutes, the retail sales associate handed me a custom-made pair of Oakley Radar® sunglasses to try on. The frames were the color of my choice (Matte Black/Grey) and the Pitch® lenses were chosen to complement the shape of my face. They came with the optional Iridium® glare-reduction coating I had requested. The sunglasses were designed with many of the features I couldn’t get with the ordinary ones I used to own: lenses that would block out harmful UV rays and prevent rain and sweat from building up, a nosepiece that would continue to grip even during heavy summer perspiration, a lightweight frame that would be as comfortable to wear at the end of the day as it was in the beginning, and impact-resistant lenses for blocking high-velocity projectiles from reaching my eyes while on the range. Oh, and did I mention how good they looked when I finally tried them on?

By finding a way to make my experience with sunglasses better than I thought possible, Oakley has succeeded in turning the ordinary into something remarkable. How remarkable, you ask? So much so that I was willing to pay almost 10 times as much as I used to pay for the ordinary sunglasses I once wore.       

 

Two weeks ago LinkedIn posted an interesting blog on "the most clichéd and overused phrases for the past year."  Using over 85 million LinkedIn profiles, they found the 2010 top 10 buzzwords used in the USA and Internationally. Both sets of words are below (pictures from the LinkedIn blog).

If you'd like additional resources to help with your LinkedIn profile, see the list at the bottom.

For the United States:

1. Extensive experience
2. Innovative
3. Motivated
4. Results-oriented
5. Dynamic
6. Proven track record
7. Team player
8. Fast-paced
9. Problem solver
10. Entrepreneurial

And it shared some of "the most overused buzzword in LinkedIn Profiles in 11 countries" that included:

1. Extensive Experience – USA, Canada, Australia
2. Dynamic – Brazil, India, Spain
3. Motivated – UK
4. Innovative – France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands

Resources to Help You Improve Your LinkedIn Profile

- LinkedIn for Job Hunters: Tips to Create a Must-Read Profile
- If Your LinkedIn Profile is not Generating New Opportunities, Consider Changing Your Headline
- Is Your LinkedIn Story a Best Seller?
- It’s Who Knows You: Three Little Known Ways to Turn LinkedIn into a More Valuable Sales Tool

During lunch today I asked the waiter his thoughts on the glazed salmon entrée. He enthusiastically recommended it. He began describing the dish. As he did so, he mentioned "wilted spinach." 

Mentally, I stopped listening.

I wanted to be a bit of a wise guy and say, "I'd prefer my spinach fresh and crisp." I held my tongue (smile).

Words are interesting, aren't they? To me, wilted spinach is not the best choice of words. Now of course, I know what wilted spinach is and what it means. It means preparation, timing, and passion. 

Ask yourself these three quick questions to see if you need to tweak or revise your content and messaging?

1. Do we have content or messaging in our various internal and external communications not generating the results we want (e.g., website, employee handbook, elevator speech/elevator pitch, mission statement, blog, newsletter, and magazine)?
2. Are we aware of content or messaging that might be confusing?
3. Have any of our audiences expressed confusion or misunderstanding? Did we deliberately address the issue either to leave the content as is or change it?

Is Your LinkedIn Profile a Best Seller?  Let’s assume it is and your profile is among the first to appear in a search for people with your background and aspirations.

What happens when a hiring manager or recruiter opens it? What story is your profile telling about your personal brand? Is it strengthening or diluting the hiring manager's brand impression? Does your personal brand stand out from the others who are competing against you for the same opportunity?

If your profile is sprinkled with one or more of the 2010 Top 10 overused buzzwords identified by LinkedIn last week, chances are it doesn’t. This list consists of the most clichéd and overused phrases culled from over 85 million LinkedIn profiles:

1. Extensive experience
2. Innovative
3. Motivated
4. Results-oriented
5. Dynamic
6. Proven track record
7. Team player
8. Fast-paced
9. Problem solver
10. Entrepreneurial

Because so many others are using these phrases, they have lost their uniqueness. They’ve become part of the vernacular of resumes and job searches. Their meaning is ambiguous (e.g., what really constitutes extensive experience, anyway?). They can even dilute the hiring manager's impression of your personal brand.

To help make your personal brand stand out in LinkedIn, be different. Try using more descript words and phrases in your profile. Connect your phrases to specific results and explain how your accomplishments might benefit a future employer (e.g., Relevant experience includes leading the design and production of nine direct mail advertising campaigns over a 12-month period, achieving an overall response rate of 8% and an average reduction of 2% in per customer acquisition costs).

Imagine the impact you will have by showing potential employers how you can contribute to their organizations in a meaningful way! By strengthening the hiring manager's impression of your personal brand, you will surely differentiate yourself from your competitors.

Article Summary:  LinkedIn is an integral part of your job search. LinkedIn complements and extends your credibility and therefore enhances your attractiveness as a job candidate. Imagine you were an executive comparing two candidates—both with stellar credentials. One has only a resume, while the other presents a resume and a full LinkedIn profile, complete with glowing recommendations from former bosses, colleagues, staff, and clients. Whom would you prefer to interview? The power of LinkedIn is the access it provides to information about you, information that you define and control, and information not available anywhere else. This article focuses on optimizing your LinkedIn content and messaging.   [Note, this article was originally written for the Marketing Executives Networking Group (MENG)

If you have any preferences or requests for topics, contact us by telephone, email, or leave a comment on this blog entry.

To read other articles in The Chief Storyteller Blog, select the category, Articles.

 

LinkedIn for Job Hunters: Tips to Create a Must-Read Profile
© 2010. The Chief Storyteller®, LLC.
Ira J. Koretsky
November 2010

LinkedIn is an integral part of your job search. LinkedIn complements and extends your credibility and therefore enhances your attractiveness as a job candidate. Imagine you were an executive comparing two candidates—both with stellar credentials. One has only a resume, while the other presents a resume and a full LinkedIn profile, complete with glowing recommendations from former bosses, colleagues, staff, and clients. Whom would you prefer to interview?

The power of LinkedIn is the access it provides to information about you, information that you define and control, and information not available anywhere else.

Some food for thought:
-    There are 80,000 million members of LinkedIn
-    Most of the Fortune 500 has at least some of their executive team on LinkedIn
-    For some companies, LinkedIn is used as a crucial filter to determine whether to bring someone in for an interview
-    In a typical Internet search of a person’s name, LinkedIn appears on the first page of search results, and usually in the first five links

This article focuses on optimizing your LinkedIn content and messaging (Note: I’d be happy to write articles on how to use LI in your job search. Please leave a comment with your suggestions or email me).

Here are some tips to create a must-read profile.

1. Create a Memorable Professional Headline
Use the Professional Headline field to make a first impression that screams, “Read me now.” By default, LinkedIn populates your Professional Headline with your current title and company (see Exhibit 1 below). Many members do not change it. Click [Edit] beside your title and customize it to a powerful headline that grabs the reader’s attention. A compelling headline is the foundation of business storytelling. Think of it as your personal brand statement and your unique selling proposition. As in Example 2, it should summarize your potential value.

Some examples include “Building Great Brands for 25 Years,” “Growing Departments into Divisions,” and “Positioning Fortune 2000 Companies for Explosive Growth.” Your headline should represent your personal AND your professional self.

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2. Make Your Summary Engaging and Compelling
Follow up your memorable and customized Professional Headline with an informative and compelling Summary. Make it easy to read and engaging. Use bullet statements, short sentences and paragraphs, search-engine friendly words and phrases, and industry buzzwords.

For content in your Summary, read “How to Write a Resume Summary That Gets Interviews.” There, you will find several specific suggestions with examples. Ensure your LinkedIn summary contains the exact same information from your resume, fleshed out with relevant details. Choose details to pique your reader’s interest and help you stand out. As in business, know your audience. What would your readers find interesting about you? Examples include brief success stories, high-impact accomplishments, guest lectureships, volunteer activities, experiences with hot trends, etc.

3. Improve Your Credibility
Ask for recommendations to demonstrate your credibility and capability. Recommendations from professionals who know your work first hand differentiate you. They serve as “mini” business stories to tout the benefits of working with you and your organization. Ask current and former bosses, staff, co-workers, colleagues, partners, clients and vendors.

In fact, offer to help write it to ensure your key words and messages are included in the testimonial. Each recommendation should tell a different and complementary story about your personal and professional life and successes. I suggest you create a spreadsheet and group your skills logically per recommendation (see below).

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Spend the Time
Use the LinkedIn search function. Type in your desired position title. See how people already in these positions present themselves. By spending just a few hours, you can create a LinkedIn profile to be proud of. And, over time, ask for recommendations, tweak the search-engine-friendly terms as well as industry buzzwords, and continually add to and update your content. Ask friends and colleagues for feedback. And then accept the feedback with a smile and say thank you. LinkedIn should be an important tool in your job search.

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Ira Koretsky is the president of The Chief Storyteller®, a boutique marketing and sales consulting firm. He has delighted audiences around the world helping them achieve better business outcomes and accelerate their revenue with highly effective written, spoken, and social media communications. With over 25 years of experience, he is a sought-after global speaker, columnist, consultant, and executive coach. Find him on Twitter, LinkedIn®, and YouTube.

 

Microsoft recently launched its new lines of smart phones to compete against Apple's iPhone and Google's Android. Microsoft has been effectively using YouTube to showcase its advertisements, functionality, and feedback.

It is employing the concept of "Really" throughtout the ads. It is simultaneously poking fun at current mobile fun usage and pointing out how some people are using their phones shall we say, a bit too much. While the ads are clever and engaging, sometimes they try too hard or seem not to make immediate sense. See if you agree...

Click on the pictures below to see the various commercials.

Thursday, December 09, 2010

A Thing of Beauty Is a Joy Forever

 

One of my favorite literary works is John Keats’ Endymion, a masterful poem about the myth of a mortal loved by the goddess of the moon. The first line, “A thing of beauty Is a joy forever,” almost always comes to mind whenever I find myself outside enjoying the sights and sounds of the unspoiled wilderness.

As a hiker, I have experienced breathtaking views of waterfalls, vistas, fauna, and flora from vantage points accessible to few others. Memories of nights spent sleeping under the stars, hiking to Shenandoah’s Dark Hollow Falls, reaching the snowy summit of Mt. Washington in New Hampshire, immersing myself in the lush jungle along Kauai’s Kalalau Trail, or swimming at secluded Hanakapiai Beach on the Na Pali Coast are the only reminders I need of how important it is to be a good steward of the environment.

And yet, I’m amazed at how difficult it is to “sell” many people on the importance of conservation and other steps to protect our environment. I’ve seen too many instances where well-intentioned people resort to complicated and often-confusing explanations of what’s wrong and what needs to be done. I’ve heard the arguments from both sides on controversial issues like global warming, carbon offsets, and greenwashing. In all of this noise, the simple message of "help protect the beauty of our world" is invariably lost.

It’s all quite simple, really. Where words betray, images empower. Where words merely describe, images show. The right images can take you there and help you to experience the wonder and awe of nature’s beauty. The right images can help your target audience connect with your cause or message.

Think back to the memories I described earlier and the images of beauty they evoke. These are the images of joy, peace, and a oneness with nature. Why? Because the words written 200 years ago by an English Romantic poet still ring true today: “a thing of beauty is a joy forever.”

Holiday and dinner parties, business networking events, and visits with family and friends all present opportunities for people to pitch their brand and tell their story in 30 seconds or less.

I'd like for you to take a simple test. Select the best answer to the statement: Elevator speeches are for people with the following job responsibilities:

a) Sales
b) Marketing
c) Sales and Marketing
d) Everyone
e) No one

While the obvious choices may be a, b, or c, the correct answer is d. From the CEO on down to the most junior entry-level member of your team, each and every one of us encounters opportunities where we are called upon to talk about our job, our brand and the organization to which we belong or represent. Very often, these opportunities begin with the question, “What do you do?”

The answer to this question is your organization's elevator speech. Your elevator speech must quickly convey the qualities of your brand that attract the right target audiences. It must be memorable, compelling, and deliverable within 30 seconds or less.

A well-crafted elevator speech can be an effective way for increasing brand equity. A unified brand story, where everyone is literally singing from the same songbook, will lead to increased reach and frequency of your brand message in the marketplace. This, in turn, will lead to more sales, more clients, and other top line business results.

Additional resources on brand storytelling:
- The “What Do You Do?” Answer: A Key Tool in Your Sales Toolbox (article)
- Wow! Tell Me More - An Article for United Kingdom Charities (article)
- Elevator Speech – Not Just for Breakfast Anymore

EIZO Nanao Corporation (EIZO) desired to grow its business. As a company with a niche product line in medical imaging and monitors, it needed a creative and novel approach to generating interest to help it stand out from the competition in a small market. EIZO hired the advertising agency Butter. Butter is from Berlin/Duesseldorf in Germany.

Nadine Schlichte, Art Director at Butter, concieved of the idea for a unique pinup calendar. The calendar would be offered to prospective and current physician clients. Each picture of the month shows a naked skeleton image of woman. The developed slogan is "The EIZO Medical pin-up calendar — just like EIZO monitors — really does show every detail." The calendar was released in May 2010.

“Our actual intention was to stimulate more interest for what is the highly complex, technically sophisticated area of EIZO monitors  for diagnostic purposes and viewing of x-ray images,” say Butter, “As you can imagine, the target market for this kind of specialist, highly-priced monitors is very small.”

While most people believe each month to show a different woman, the creative team at Butter developed the monthly models from computer CGI illustrations.

The EIZO calendar description includes "Whereas craftsmen are showered with pin-up-calendars at the end of every year, this kind of present is less popular among physicians. EIZO breaks this taboo. This pin-up calendar shows absolutely every detail.

The calendar and the pictures went viral quickly. Additionally, Butter and EIZO garned several advertising and related creativity awards.

In fact, the calendar was so successful, EIZO is now taking orders for the 2011 calendar [which looks to be the same pictures from the 2010 version].

What kind of novel ideas have you considered? Implemented?


Additional Resources
- Purchase the 2011 calendar here for ~€70 Euros or ~$95 USD
- Eizo Nanao Corporation
- Butter, Berlin/Duesseldorf, Germany
- View all of the 2010 calendar pictures from the Butter website

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