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Stop Repeating Your Name After an Introduction – It Reduces Your Impact

By September 17, 2018 February 28th, 2019 No Comments
male executive, suit and no tie, on stage repeating his introduction

I attended a conference today. And the executive introducing the keynote speaker repeated his name and title, not 30 seconds after he was just introduced. This reduced his communication effectiveness and the impression the audience has of him and has of his company.

Here’s what happened:

a) Mary, the conference host, is at the podium. She introduces an executive from the major event sponsor, Company ABC. She says to the audience…
Ladies and gentlemen. It is my pleasure to introduce to you our event sponsor, William Businessman, Senior Vice President for Strategic Partnerships and Channel Programs (audience applauses). He will be introducing our keynote presenter, Sally Speaker.

b) William comes up to the podium. He begins his introduction with the following…
Good morning. Thank you for the honor of addressing you today. As Mary said, I am William Businessman, Senior Vice President for Strategic Partnerships and Channel Programs. I’d like to introduce…(introduction continues)

I wish I knew why the “Williams” of the world repeat the information just shared moments ago.

What I do know is…listen to the audience immediately following the repeated information. You will hear them snicker and make unfavorable comments about the presenter and his unnecessary repetition.

After receiving his introduction, I suggest William say the following…

Good morning. Thank you for the honor of addressing you today. State a well-crafted 30-second elevator pitch. Transition smoothly from your elevator pitch as to why your organization is an event sponsor. Transition then to an engaging and inpsiring bio about Sally the Keynote Speaker. 

 

ADDITIONAL COMMUNICATION AND STORYTELLING TIPS

Photography Source:  Flickr, LivingCities

Ira Koretsky

About Ira Koretsky

Ira Koretsky has built The Chief Storyteller® into one of the most recognized names in business storytelling. He has delivered over 500 keynote presentations and workshops in nearly a dozen countries, in more than one hundred cities, across 30 plus industries. His specialties are simplifying the complex and communicating when the stakes are high. He is also an adjunct professor in public speaking and storytelling at the University of Maryland's Business School. With over 25 years of experience, he is a sought-after global speaker, trainer, consultant, and executive communication coach.